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mark on american law in his 33 years on the bench, but his greatest contribution is is renowned commentaries on the constitution. justice story a famously and correctly declared "a constitutional government is addressed to the common sense of the people and never was designed for trials of logical skills or visionary speculation." this lecture series celebrates his legacy in the law. prior lectures have been judge robert bork, professor john harrison, judge raymond randolph, and chief justice of the united states court of appeals of the sixth circuit. tonight, we're honored to add a fifth name to that prestigious list as a welcome justice anthony kennedy. justice kennedy received his bachelor of arts degree from stanford university and the london school of economics and his law degree from harvard law school. prior to this public service, the justice served in private practice in san francisco and sacramento. i can attest to his prowess as an attorney because on one very interesting occasion, he represented me. [laughter] on a speeding ticket. [laughter] and got me off with a mi
? >> it would be much larger constituency about creating that device. >> beyond that, law enforcement has other techniques. they do not need a special device. there is still reckless driving on the books, the power of the nation -- of observation and other evidence that can be relied upon. the same outcome to restrict -- >> can odor be introduced as evidence? rex the officers perception of an odor can. some potential evidence. >> talking about regulating the illegal drugs, they mentioned that 80% of the position painkillers in the world are sold in the united states. five percent of the population of the world's 80% of the world's painkillers. drug related overdoses for death -- close to 70% were from prescription drugs. even the drugs that we regulate -- we do not seem to be doing too good of a drug -- of a job at a lot of people are dying to reque. >> we would not have any car fatalities if there were no cars. i do not need to make light of what you're saying but the fact that failure of the peace and not condemn the value that exists for these other off -- these other. this brings up a large
with supreme court justice anthony kennedy. and then yale law professor talks about how president obama stance on same-sex marriage. this week on "newsmakers, "president of the service employees international union talks about what unions like the seiu are looking for in budget negotiations. can see "newsmakers" at 10:00 a.m. >> what about if the soviet union announces tomorrow but if we attack cuba, it is going to be nuclear war? >> serious things here, we're .oing to be uneasy p >> something may make these people should off. -- shoot it off. i would want to make my own people very alert. >> it is a fascinating moment. it is amazing that eisenhower tells him to have a people alert. of course people are alert. kennedy laps. then he says, -- laughs. then he says, hang on tight. they're able to joke a little bit with each other. especially during this crisis, the had a sense of how lonely it is to occupy that office and i were getting all kinds of a device, good advice, a lot of faulty advice, which kennedy was. eisenhower knew all about faulty military advice. he is able to speak with supreme a
for 35 years. he was the president back then, too, of the harvard law review. we had -- we are used to holding the reins of power. a chief justice also holds the reins of power. the only difference is that a chief justice must hold them lightly, lest he discovered they are not allowed the -- attached to anything. nevertheless, i know some long and personal experience that david brings to rice, a special vision, telecom and leadership. this school is fortunate to have him at the helm, and i know he feels blessed to be here. i am pleased that they invited me to visit rice as part of the centennial celebration of the university's foundation, and i extend my sincere congratulations to the trustees, the faculty, students, and alumni on your first great century. the founding of a new university is always an historic occasion, but the founding ceremony for rice was truly extraordinary. i went back to read the newspaper accounts from october, 1912, that recorded the event. the papers reported that the distinguished first president of rice invited 150 pronounced scholars from around the worl
. military, intelligence, diplomatic, law enforcement, economic, and above all, the power of our values as americans. i kinda has sought to operate in areas beyond the reach of affective security and governance -- al qaeda has sought to operate in areas beyond the reach of the effective security in governance. they are now seeking to take a vantage of the transition to gain new sanctuary and incite violence. know that al qaeda and its affiliates are looking to establish a foothold in other countries in the middle east and africa, including the group in nigeria. the international community and our regional partners share our alcern about molali, where qaeda affiliated groups have taken hold in the north. we are also concerned about libya. with respect to the attack, let me be clear. we will work with the libyan government to bring to justice those who perpetrated the attacks. to protect americans at home and overseas, we need to continue to pursue al qaeda wherever they seek to hide. we must be constantly vigilant. we must be constantly determined to pursue this enemy, but what will it t
who makes the laws. caller: president obama could not put anything in there before his term going out. i have been following this for years. usually the incoming president has bills that the previous president left. on this president's way out, congress would not let him put any deals in. they put enough in there to finish his term. host: the president has been reelected and will be back in next year. but i appreciate the call. i want to point to an obituary in the new york times today on the death of warren redmon. he dies at age 82. the sometimes combative centrist republican senator from new hampshire. you will be seeing those obituaries in several papers today. coming up next, a top supreme court reporter david savage will join us to talk about some of that the-profile cases an accord will be taking up. and later, phyllis bennis will take a closer look at where u.s. troops are deployed around the world, and not just in the middle east. first, turning back to warren rudman. he was a moderate republican senator from new hampshire. he was 82 years old when he died. he sat down with c
, i cannot give that to you. because actually, by law, by law, the secret service have to protect the president, first lady, and the family. and in our day -- daddy was vice president, and that is when they changed the law. imagine what it would have been like if they had not changed the law. at that time, it was just the president. and the law was changed to include the vice president. imagine what it would have been like in dallas. but lucy did not get her day free from the secret service. >> she could get almost anything but not that. you had many unique experiences. i believe the only prom held in the white house and one of the very few weddings. >> it was very exciting. as a matter of fact, the previous big wedding was alice longworth. princess alice, they called her. in our day, she was the cat's meow in washington. she said -- she had a pillow that said "if you do not have anything nice to say to anybody, come and sit next to me." [laughter] she was wonderful to listen to as long as she wasn't saying anything bad about you. but she came to our wedding. i mean, she was fasci
residents in every state to secede from the united states. a georgetown university law professor is our guest. "washington journal" is next. host: federal officials including lawmakers on capitol hill are looking at how to slash wait times and possibly boost early voting. that will be hours subject for the first section of this edition of "the washington journal." for the first 45 minutes we will be talking to you about remedies to speed up the voting process. the numbers are on the screen. you can reach out to us by social media. @cspanwj. the conversation constantly going on on facebook -- facebook.com/cspan. we begin this morning with a look at the lead story in "the baltimore sun." pushed to speed of voting processes is the headline. he writes -- we want to find out from you, our viewers and listeners, your thoughts and remedies on speeding up the voting process. more from the article in "the baltimore sun." the article goes on to talk about a bill being proposed by virginia by senator mark warner. it says -- we would like to show you a little bit more about what the presiden
constitutional law. host: does fighting cyber crime violate the law? caller: the bill that is actually being passed to create cyber police or cyber security -- this deal that created violates the constitutional laws. host: we have a couple of bills on the table, but we also seeing the white house. we mentioned that the president has asked for the military to act more aggressively. guest: obviously, i do not have all of the details on this particular bill because it is classified. however, i can tell you, have spent nine years until the military. i have been a part of a lot of operations. in every case, the legal opinion was always an issue that was never passed over to ensure that not just u.s. citizens' rights were in storage but also the rights of the international. i cannot comment on the bill. i have not seen it. i can tell the historically i have never come across a situation where the law was something that was ignored. host: the reason you have not seen it is because it is a secret directive that this point. "the washington post" goes on to say -- give us a sense of how the government
but by harnessing every element of american power, military intelligence, diplomatic law enforcement, financial, economic, and above all, the power of our values as americans. al qaeda has long sought to operate in areas beyond the reach of effective security and governance. after being left on the sidelines of the momentous changes that swept through the arab world last year, they are now seeking to take advantage of the transition period to gain new sanctuary, to incite violence, and to sow instability. we know that al qaeda, its affiliates and adherents are looking to establish a foothold in other countries in the middle east and north and west africa including al qaeda in the islamic nigreb and nigeria. the international community and regional partners share concern about mali where al qaeda affiliated groups have taken control of territories in the and pose an emerging threat. we are also concerned about libya where violent extremists and affiliates of al qaeda attacked and killed innocent americans in benghazi. respect to that attack, let me be clear, we will work with the libyan governme
's social and law and order conservatives, who are concerned about preserving america's unique culture and the maintenance of social order. to these conservatives the presence of large numbers of people in the united states and in violation of american law is inherently problematic. what's more, many of them aren't wild about the influx of large numbers of illegal immigrants either, arguing that any culture needs sufficient time for new arrivals to assimilate and that cultures can benefit from periodic pauses in immigration. now, there's some other camps as well, for example, moral and social conservatives, such as some in the catholic church and other religious groups who favor what might be called a light-touch approach to immigration on what they believe are social justice grounds. but the broader point is there is a deep tension and division on the right on immigration, and there has been for decades now. the recent presidential election has brought the immigration issue once again to the center of american politics. governor mitt romney received a small percentage of latino and as
of the fundamental international law. so i think it's quite clear to me that the breakdown of the talks that israel will take a step. maybe supported by president obama. i'm very pessimistic about that. >> what's the result of that strike? what does that lead to from there? briefly. >> well, some of us are old enough to remember the complaints -- they had big problems in the review conference. no agreements. there was a lot of ar mess. of course the assembly of the u.n. reacted very heavily at that time. but the problem is that the lack of leadership will tolerate it. i'm concerned. i hope it won't happen. i hope there is leadership dialogue. i think israel also. on the future, dare i say something much more optimistic. i see u.s.-iranian cooperation. on iraq, on afghanistan, the common interest that will be helpful for the people and it will be peaceful and stable afghanistan, including taking -- studying the drug trafficking which is very important, a key component in the afghanistan scenario for iran but also for the whole europe. i hope five years in a israel and iran will say they are strategi
on this -- i think selena deliver market is the way to go. i think minimum wage laws very often penalizes workers, especially low income workers. and especially teenagers who may actually not be able to have the sk that will getathat level. we need to get rid of licensing, occupational licensing laws. whether it is for cabdrivers or braiding hair, there are some new laws that keep people outside of the labor force. there are so many things that we should do to free the labor markets, to trigger economic growth, to get low sale workers. and investing in infrastructure. infrastructure workers have high skills. we do not go and hire people from the and a plumb line did not have the skills. i would to the last thing we want to see is reform of the school system. i believe that school choice is a great thing and would help really low income families and are now trapped in a very low performing schools. guest: i think, education and training is a big part of the answer, whether at k12, or as people finish their primary education and move on into college or an apprenticeship. we could use more o
said that we should return to the clinton era tax law. just think of that era we had. we had a budget surpluses. and we had a winning prosperity. i do not think we need to fear returning to the clinton tax law. and as the caller said from texas, the democrats have demonized the bush tax cuts. and so we will see with the demon is. the 47% who do not pay income tax from about 30% of them will return to the tax rolls. and at least the pain is like to be spread around here to everybody. and i find the connection of the grover norquist problem is that if we returned to the clinton tax law, then everybody next year will just want to reduce taxes and the republicans will be free to vote for those things without the pledge interfering with that. i think what would solve that issue as well. so i think we would all be a lot better off. more dollars over 10 years. and it would come from every american. we have a huge problem here. and by the president's position of and not willing to dip below $250,000, is just as impractical as grover norquist's no tax pledge. i find the president's position ju
the constitution was passed, i can understand the power of the legislature. but today i think any law passed by the legislature should be turned into a referendum and voted on by all of us with on- line computers and free long- distance phone calls. let the people speak approval of what the congress passes or veto it. host: do you think enough people would get involved in the state conversation like that? caller: i do, on the issues they are passing now in congress, like spending, spending what they don't have. they're spending my money. the obamacare would never have passed in front of the american people when it was originally proposed and passed by a democratic house and executive branch. i think we have a runaway government that is in too much of my daily living and business. host: on twitter -- you can send us your tweet. in other news, we told you about the egyptian president, what the baltimore sun is calling as startling call or grab weakening the courts and freeing him from judicial oversight committee deepening political intrigue in the arab world's most populous nation. next to th
and responsibly comply with tax laws. there is plenty of tax evasion out there, but most americans fulfill their responsibilities, but taxes are extracted. we have to pay for government. we, in public administration, believe in good government. the problem is, how do we maintain it would we have to criticize it all the time? how do we maintain the good parts of it? the other contribution to the decline in the prestige reagan , even of government included pro-market anti-government. by economists which were very prominent academically. reaganomics was, in a sense, invented on university campuses. the media describe themselves as a watchdog, quite appropriately. it is essential we have an aggressive news media that hold the government and other entities accountable. if they are doing things wrong, we want them to report and criticizing it -- criticized it. however, what are the limits on the process? political scientists have done studies in recent decades in which they have analyzed media coverage and pointed out that media coverage of politics and government have become increasingly negati
, they are mandated by law -- mr. reagan and his troops, when they read it so security in 1983-1986, they came up with federal employees retirement system. they were wanting to eliminate several services altogether. that was because of the benefits. if you have $1,000 so security retirement for your benefit ♪s. ts, it would offset your benefits by $1,000 also. you're supposed to get say 1275 and you get $1,000 worth of social security, they reduce your disability retirement by $1,000. host: got it. ♪ caller it doesn't leave you a whole lot oin there. there were a lot of private, wealthy people who cut benefits to the people who are served by them and chop it up. you figure 300 different companies are running it, they are not going to be able run it efficiently and work together. guest: the caller points out that there is a lot of this dispute that has to do with the sort of basic mathematics of benefits that are going to be owed to the postal service workers that will be retiring in the next few years. really, the crunch time is really going to be over the next 5-10 years. they are trying to
skirt immigration laws. immigration reform is the right thing to do as well as economically smart thing to do. children should not have to live in the fear of their parents' deportation every day of their lives. and the most vulnerable people in our society should not be subject to harassment. i am truly appreciative of the support we have received from the urban league and other african-american leaders on this issue. i know there have been tensions in the past. i believe like reverend dr. martin luther king jr., when we have tensions we have to embrace them so we can come together. let's get a solution on this issue. when we come together, we can figure this out. i had the privilege of marching earlier this year in the annual march from selma, montgomery. it was an incredible feeling. there i was with congressman john lewis, someone who has an historic role from the original march and so many others. it was ethel kennedy. it was reverend al sharpton. there were hispanic leaders there, including myself. everyone came together. when we came over the bridge, i got a glimpse into what the
took an oath to abide by the laws of this state and our constitution here and the constitution of the united states. i'm on the spot here, you know. i've taken an oath to do that. and you know what our laws are. >> yes, i understand that. now we have a -- >> we have a statute that was enacted a couple of weeks ago stating that no one who had been convicted of a crime or with a criminal action against him would not be eligible. and that's our law and it seems like the court of appeals didn't pay attention to that. >> well, of course the problem is, governor, that i've got my responsibility, just like you have yours, and my responsibility, of course is -- >> i realize that, and i appreciate that so much. >> here's the thing, governor. the attorney general can talk to mr. watkins tomorrow. what i would like to do is to try to work this out in an amicable way. we don't want a lot of people down there getting hurt. it's very easy -- >> let me say this. calling me and others all over the state wanting to bring 500, and 200. >> i know. well, we don't want to have a lot of people getti
through college and law school. these loans make a big difference, whether it is pell grants or loans. let me look at this honestly. 25% of the federal aid education goes to for-profit schools. they have more than double the student loan default rate than any other. there are ways to cut back on spending and education that will give us opportunities and resources for real education, which can be part of our future. when it comes to the most painful topic of all. i came here in 1983 and was told social security would be on its way out. we rolled up with our sleeves and came up with a bipartisan solution that ultimately bought over 50 years of solvency for social security. we raised the retirement age, payable taxes on social security, and we taxed those social security benefits indirectly for the first time. today, social security will make every promised payment for the next 22 years. you cannot say that about much in washington. social security has not added one penny to the deficit. for those who say there is good reason to push it off the table and wait, i would add a note of caution. s
detail. >> what you make me proud as a former law professor of what a law professor can do. you have done tremendous things for the case of marriage equality. my question follows up on your notion of marriage pluralism. my former colleague says marriage is two things -- a standard form contract that establishes certain kinds of liberal basic rights but also a sanctification. constituting form. she argues in liberal state has no business sanctifying relationships and that will be ought to be doing is be establishing, dis-establishing marriages altogether. do you see that 20 years and now when you give this talk will not even use the word marriage? >> it depends a william e. my liberal. if you are a libertarian liberal, as the cato institute is, they would say yes. if you are more of the state should create conditions for human flourishing, the answer is not simple. here is what i will say more broadly. one of the easy mistakes of the whole debate is an over investment in lesbian and gay people on marriage and family lot generally. most people who are in relationships are in relationships b
♪ >> a reading from the book of exodus. moses was keeping the flock of his father-in-law. he led his flock beyond the wilderness and came to the mountain of god. the angel of the lord appeared to him and a flame of fire out of a bush. he looked, and the bush was blazing, yet it was not consumed. and then moses said, i must turn aside and look at this great site and see why the bush is not burned up. when the lord saw that he had turned aside to see, god called to him out of the bush. moses, moses. and he said, here i am. and then god said, come no closer. remove the sandals from your feet. the place on which you are standing is holy ground. he said further, i am day god -- the god of your father, the god of abraham, the god of isac, and the god of jacob. -- god of isaac, and the god of jacob. and moses hid his face, for he was afraid to look at god. then the lord said, i have observed the misery of my people who are in egypt. i have heard their cries on account of their taskmasters. i know their sufferings. i have come to deliver them from the egyptians. and to bring them up out of that land, to
who had physician cal maturity but not emotional maturity. we invented hools and child labor laws and it took forty years to create the word teenager. that was invented by somebody in their 60's but the main lesson is these stages of life were responses to problems. they were solutions. and it's ironic that it was stanley hall himself, the inventor of youth who proposed twenty years later a stage between midlife and old age arguing that he had actually made a mistake. he should have invented this stage for people like himself. he promptly passed away a year later but in writing about this period, he had asset of beautiful images and insights which make a lot of sense almost 100 years later. he described this period as an indian summer. and he said human beings didn't reach the height of their capacity until the shad dozen slanted eastward. the idea was more and more people were reaching a point where they had the benefits of experience and the capacity to do something with it. there was a book a couple of years ago that described the key traites of this period as active wisdom. i
money is that money, regulations -- that affected all the campaign fance laws. the citizens united decision was totally predictable as a response to mccain-fine gold. despite my working for john mccain, who had a campaign finance reform position i always thought was blazingly unconstitutional -- we have weakened the political parties and weaken the candidate committees. the political parties have been moderating influences in american politics -- the political parties goal is to assemble aajory, not to advance an ideology. the advancement of an ideology by either party is secondaryis a function of the majority. now, with all the super pac money there is incasingly ideological mey, increasing the enforcement money. reagan talked about the fact that if you are with me 80% of the time you are not my political opponent, you are my political ally. in a super p world where you have a apostate republican or an apostate democrats on an issue, you will see the enforcement of ideological discipline through the use of the super pac in a primary on either the left or the right. it has the fact
. that is the law that created sequestration, which is the automatic spending cuts split between defense and non-defense spending. it's all part of what is being debated right now in the house and senate and white house. the sequester is set to take effect on january 1 along with some expiring tax provisions, part of what folks are calling the fiscal cliff. that's tonight on c-span at 8:00, looking back on what started this debate and how congress is dealing with it now. thanks for all your calls. coming up, the future of the republican party,. with matt, later we will talk with dan glickman on whether congress can reach compromise during the lame-duck session. -- we will speak about the future of the republican party with matt lesis. we will be right back. [video clip] >> you listen to mayor bloomberg, said the damage was an president and maybe the worst storm the city ever faced and the tidal surge was 14. governor chris christie said the damage in new jersey was unthinkable and we had fires and hurricane force winds, massive flooding, deepersnow. when you looked at that and but flooding to th
enforcement, along with the u.s. customs and border protection, as well as federal and local and foreign law enforcement has created this initiative. the first best initiative was created in laredo back in 2005. and it's become a model across the country. and this is a comprehensive approach to identify, disrupt, dismantle transnational criminal organizations that have posed significant threats to the border and maritime security. through investigations, seize years of contra-- seizures of contraband, they are building success. there are 48 units throughout the united states. they work not only with the mexican counterparts but with the canadian counterparts. certainly we want to make sure that congress provides the best support to the best units in order to enhance border security and of course the communities that we have -- that we all represent. so, again, members, i would ask that you all work and support this bill and today, a very appropriate time, we had the new president-elect of mexico that came down here, met with members of congress and i believe at this particular time he's meet
will also hear from president obama, who signed the deficit reduction measure into law, part of the deal to raise the debt ceiling. first, senate majority leader harry reid and republican majority leader mitch mcconnell will talk on the senate floor about the january fiscal deadline. >> since our country voted to return president obama to the white house, i have spoken often about compromise. i remain optimistic that, when it comes to our economy, when it comes to protecting middle-class families from a whopping tax hike, republicans and democrats will be able to find common ground. president dwight eisenhower, a republican, once said, "people talk about the middle of the road as though it were unacceptable. there have to be compromises. the middle of the road is all usable space." so said white house and higher. -- dwight eisenhower. too often, we face off, not realizing that the solution rests somewhere in the middle. i remind everyone of one fact. this congress is one vote away from avoiding a fiscal cliff for middle-class families and small businesses. we can solve the greatest econo
at 6:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> paul rothstein is a law professor and an here is to talk to us about petitions to secede filed in every state, citizens have signed to secede from the united states, many of which side to the declaration of independence or the size of government. professor rothstein, welcome to the program. are you surprised by all of these petitions coming from across the country? is this a new phenomenon? guest: during my lifetime there have been several, near every time people get upset with an issue, there is a movement on the part of some people to get to their state to secede. host: what is it that is driving this movement this time around? guest: dissatisfaction with who won the election. it was relatively close, not that hair close, but a lot of people feel strongly about it. host: talk to us about what is actually in the constitution, or how a state would go about seceding from the united states. guest: there is nothing directly in the constitution about it. there are some things that the different sides of the debate site in their favor. perhaps the strongest
. when you are working with building codes or resigning -- zoning restrictions or environmental laws and limitations, you have to work within those confines. the carrier's learned something with every natural disaster, every storm the face. they learn, what is the right for to put equipment on the tax touch fuel do you need? -- -- right floor to put equipment on, how much fuel do you need? they learn how to coordinate with first responders in advance. we meet with the mat and the department of homeland security and fcc -- fema and the department of homeland security and fcc to make sure that the folks have the right credentials in place to be able to get through blockades that public safety puts in place. the investment is ongoing, it is tremendous, to make sure that these networks continue to run. >> what is the cost of this storm to your member organizations? >> it is not something that anyone really looks at. i think they look at it as part of the business of making sure the networks are up and running, that consumers continue -- i have not seen a number. i do not expect i will. i
that if it could not pass that two-part test, then it should not become a law in the united states of america. he passed a comprehensive energy plan off the floor of this house. protected social security, advanced so many other issues. a in my opinion, tip o'neill was the elder -- was the albert einstein of politics. he knew what it took in order to make this institution work. he knew what it took to reach across the aisle, to find people of good will, to make this chamber work and to advance the agenda for this country. so for for me, it's a great honor to be here because buildings, as we name them, also embody that person. it is my hope that as people walk in and out of this building for the 21st century, that they think about who tip o'neill was. they think about, yes, how much he loved political war, but at the same time he brought his own personal warmth to that, that it was not separated here on the house floor. it is my hope in naming this building perhaps this process this great institution, can be an nated by his great legacy and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempo
, military, intelligence, diplomatic, law enforcement, financial, economic and above all, the power of our values as americans. al qaeda has long sought to operate in areas beyond the reach of effective security and governance. after being left on the sidelines of the momentous changes that swept through -- al qaeda affiliated groups are taking control of territories in the north and pose an emerging threat. we are concerned about libya, where violent extremists and affiliates of al qaeda attacked and killed innocent americans in benghazi. with respect to that attack, let me be clear, we will work with the libyan government to bring to justice those who perpetrated those attacks. to protect americans at home and overseas, we need to continue to pursue al qaeda wherever they go, whatever form they take, wherever they seek to hide. we must be constantly vigilant. we must be constantly determined to pursue this enemy. but what will it take to achieve the end of al qaeda or at least the beginning of the end? first, it will be essential to finish the job that we started and that we must complet
. that's all. that is our understanding. discussing based on multi international law. >> right. i know the united states recognizes -- who think post these islands? hoodie think has control of the islands? >> whoever has the better navy. [laughter] >> got it. this gentleman right here. yes. >> is this on? henry roth from canada. we heard technology is often the . the forgotten factor. only the numbers show about 50 million chinese men and women are involved in scientific research. like everything else, it has a jekyll and hyde personality. let's leave that aside for a moment with cyber issues and other issues that are important. some could argue that rather large segment of the chinese population is probably one of the most globally connected an open parts. looking at a way of engaging china and sing china's place in the world on this important aspect of economic development and political development, county see this playing out? i know both india and japan have engaged. >> responses to the dr. jekyll? >> sun's technology, at math, funnel to the growth of the economy's. the u.s. has wo
show. a question about the law that requires ethanol to be used in a motor fuel when there is new technology from a corporation that uses coal or natural gas to make ethanol at approximately half the cost of the current corn-based program without any government subsidy. wouldn't that make sense? guest: there are different forms of renewable energy that is out there. you talk about corn-based ethanol. a fuel standard that was created it is not workable. there was a petition saying it is driving up the cost of food and feed for cattle because of drought in the midwest and we should with that requirement. we believe the current law is unworkable and needs to be changed. we will be working with the congress to get back to a more free-market approach as it relates to forms of energy. we shouldn't pick winners or losers. the government should not pick a particular company or technology. let the market drive those. new technologies will emerge because the market will incentivize those, or to add to the mix. host: here is seadog on twitter. guest: we have a number of fleets have moved to
to a greater extent than existed before. we have greater cooperation and coordination among all levels of law enforcement. there's a greater level of respect among the private sector parts and the public sector. but cybersecurity remains, in my judgment, the lagging indicator and the lagging response. i would hope -- i would hope that partisanship be thrown aside. i would hope that fear of the government -- although i understand that well and i have been a proponent of that of an oversized government and overly strong government, but fear of that will be tempered in the sense that we understand the threat to all of us, our standard of living in so many different ways is real and that we right now have the greatest minds working on cyber. last thought is this. if any young person is looking for a job or a career for the rest of his or her life, start training in cybersecurity. we need to do more in terms of educational program. we need to do more of training. china is training a lot more people in cybersecurity than we are. it's not because they have a larger population. it's because they're d
, the first lady, and the family. when daddy was vice president, that is when they changed the law. imagine what it would have been like if they had not change the law. the law was changed to include the vice president. lucy did not get her day free from the secret service. >> anything but not that. you have both had many unique experiences. i believe the only prom held in the white house and a few weddings. >> it was very exciting. the previous a big wedding was longworth. princess alice they called her. in our day, she was the cat's meow. she had a pillow that says if you do not have anything nice to say about anybody, come and sit next to me. [laughter] she was wonderful to listen to as long as she was not telling you anything bad about you. she came to our wedding. she was fascinating. imagine teddy roosevelt's daughter. talk about a rebel. suzanne and i were just pussycats. her father said, you may not smoke under my roof. so she smoked on the roof. [laughter] she has a little green snake that was called emily spinach, which he put on her shoulder. mind you, you are talking about 1910
george w. bush signed into law. his wife, former first lady laura bush, is with us today, as is her predecessor, secretary of state hillary clinton. coming together in mutual respect, a step from the chambers where we passionately debate the issues of the day that has become almost second nature to us. but it is a blessing, and we will hear over and over during the course of this ceremony, aung san suu kyi has shown the world just how hard one it really is. on behalf of the congress, let me express how humble and honored we are by your presence here in the rotunda of the united states capitol. >> ladies and gentlemen, please stand for the presentation of the callers by the united states armed forces color guard, the singing of our national anthem, and the retiring of the colors. oh say can you see by the dawn's early light, what so proudly we hail at the twilight's last gleaming, whose broad stripes and bright stars, through the perilous fight, o'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming, and the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air, i gave proof through the ni
government rules or a law against this. i think we need more community action. host: we will stick with this conversation for another 15 minutes, but i need to give you some other news in the papers. usa today, the front-page story, looking at the housing market. and in the financial times -- overseas, here's the world section of the washington post -- this was after a report of possible poisoning reviving suspicions abound his debts. and president obama meeting yesterday with mexico's new president who will take over on saturday, meeting at the white house. try to boost relations between the detonations. and the front-page of the washington times, but it's in many of the papers this morning, angry protesters filling tahrir square in cairo. they're stepping up pressure for their president to rescind a decree that they say threaten the nation with a new era of autocracy. there's the picture on the front page of the washington times. we will be talking about this on sunday on the washington journal. back to the phone calls. john in san jose, california, independent. caller: thanks so
. >> not anymore. following our story, congress passed a law permitting its members for trading on non-public information. we began investigating charlatans. our report started a federal investigation. if convicted, they could face 20 years in prison. >> you became a made man when you were formally inducted. >> after a few minutes in the toxic recycling center, the gangs who run this place want to keep it a secret. >> if i ever get a shot at bin laden, we will take it. we got it. you will not see bin laden walking on this earth again. >> miners' world collapsed. >> the idea of being here for 69 hours is terrifying. >> the most tragic thing you have ever seen. >> it was the deep water horizon. >> at the height of a hiss, a huge explosion. i remember thinking, i am going to die. >> we cannot do it. >> it was the worst feeling i had ever felt in my life. i was sure i could do it. >> i remember it coming close to six months. i was saying, i cannot believe i am out of work as long. >> i cannot afford my house. >> tell us how much your pay has been cut. >> 50%. >> we cannot make it. >> i wro
's true is just from fcc law, the campaign needs to shut down. we cannot extent funds for not presidential activities. we have to figure out what we do next. that's the conversation we're having with our supporters now. >> there's an organization that could be called obama for america; right? >> it was during '09 and '10? >> attend could be separate from the dnc? >> it could. >> why not institutionalize it and make a candidate for the next race or nominee? >> some of it will live on. the tools that we built, target sharing, dashboard, i hope every campaign uses and becomes important. however, the important thing to note is -- i want to be firm about this. you can't just hand this to the next candidate for president. you know, this organization was built for people who supported this president and who were involved. you know, we had over 32,000 neighborhood team leaders who basically volunteered full time. those people were involved because the issues and positions the president took. we learned this to our surprise in 2010. you can't just hand it to the next candidate. want to talk about t
of the -- one of the underpinnings is a rules-based system. a respect for the rule of law. in addition to accountability to the people who elect you. canada has tremendous attachment and affection and over the largest part of the arctic. there are certain special obligations that come with that, stored ship of the environment. we have enormous interest in our own resources and our people. 40% of canadian land mass is above the 50th parallel, yet we only health -- have 100,000 of our people living there. is an enormous challenge, obligation, even to continue to exert the sovereignty. you mentioned a search and rescue. at this time of year, but there are 24 hours a day and temperatures plummet below 50 degrees celsius. you have open waters and changes that are born to create a lot of challenges because more people are simply going to go there and more countries have exerted or expressed an interest. you mentioned china. there are many others who want to be a part of this arctic council. to your question about the obligation to, i think it comes back to people playing by the rules and res
feel more comfortable talking -- where we deal with law vulnerable populations, would we as a nation be more comfortable talking -- about the role of for profits and members of congress seem to be allowing them to be part of what they craft. jim mentioned a couple of reasons why that's not the case right now. for the for-profit sector, how do you start to change that dynamic and change the culture where members of congress feel ok allowing for profits to play on a level playing field? >> it would be to say we have to do a better job of teaching economics. that would be a key part of this. so that people understand the upside to begin with. part of that challenge and what you often hear is for profits siphon money off to investors as a return and do not reinvest all their profits as a nonprofit might. chris love to point out the absurdity of that peak as you can attract capital and that doesn't actually make sense when you think about the economics. i think the bigger piece is what we have talked about here, which is to get groups to come together and to be a member you have to hit c
and will hit the ground and there is a law that says that and simply because there's some idiot out let there who claims t apples float. so, no, objectivity does not mean taking one of this side and one of that side and presenting both for the audience to select. your job as a journalist is precisely to go out, to do the reporting and then as i said earlier on, to analyze it, to separate the wheat from the chaff, to put it into a proper context and if the overwhelming scientific community or if the scientific community overwhelmingly says there is global warming, do you give a nod in the direction of some other intelligent voice? yes, why not, but not, you know, you certainly don't do it on the basis of equal time. >> and that first one, the pressure first was directed at the networks to be objective and fair, what they would do, as you remember, they would put a republican up here for 30 seconds and a democrat here for 30 seconds and then they were being objective and they felt they were telling the story but they never got at the essence of objectivity as i think you have so well desc
years as a vice president. she has experience in the law and also teaches at clara barton high people in crown -- high school in crown heights. our next caller is keen on the democrat line. good morning. we actually have jim now from wisconsin, caller: indepen. caller: i would like to ask randi weingarten, first of all, she is from new york, if i remember. teachers to sit in classrooms and they do not have students -- they get paid. that is because of the unions. about an author who wrote a book called "the shadow boxers." in 10 states, like california, with a debt of $200 billion to support public unions, ill. another one. $200 billion because of corruption in the public unions. in new york and pennsylvania. when i went to school, i am 65 years old, when i went to school i personally witnessed students sent out of the classroom and then they came back in the school and they did it again or they talked back to a teacher -- eyewitness to this. i can tell you, the high school i went to, the teacher, he was a nice guy but he had no business being a teacher. that is the problem. because o
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